Felicia P. Glover Lawrence, Ed.S, CCC-SLP

Felicia P. Glover-Lawrence attended South Carolina State University for both her bachelor’s and master’s degree in Speech Language Pathology/Audiology. She is licensed by the S.C. Board of Examiners in Speech Language Pathology and the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA). She holds the Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC). She is a member of the South Carolina Speech and Hearing Association. Strongly believing that education is never ending, Felicia earned an Educational Specialist degree (Ed.S) in School Administration in 2012. In order to remain current and abreast of new trends in speech pathology, Felicia frequently attends workshops and lectures.
Felicia has worked in various settings to include nursing homes, home health, and early intervention. She has over 16 years in the public and private school setting. Since opening Lawrence Speech Services, LLC, Felicia has found her favorite clients to work with to be those with Autism, Down Syndrome, Language disorders, Aphasia and phonological disorders.

Felicia is an avid reader and enjoys spending time with family and good friends. She has been married for 15 years and has one son and a special a dog.

Evaluations

Our clinicians are proficient in the evaluation and treatment of communication disorders for clients of all ages and serve a diverse population, ranging from pediatrics to geriatrics. We are knowledgeable, skilled, and experienced in collaborating with interdisciplinary teams to meet the comprehensive needs of our clients.

The Process

Step 1: Referral

A referral must be made in order to be seen at Lawrence Speech Services, LLC

Step 2: Screening

Lawrence Speech Services, LLC, provides free screenings, which are approximately 15-20 minutes in length. Upon completion of the screening, the clinician will determine whether or not a comprehensive evaluation is warranted. Suggestions for home activities may also be provided.
Please note that many children who do not qualify for speech therapy based on the eligibility criteria of Early Intervention or the public school system would still greatly benefit from services. If your child has not qualified for speech and language services despite your concerns, please contact us!

Step 3: The Evaluation

Lawrence Speech Services, LLC provides comprehensive speech-language evaluations assessing various speech disorders. Feedback with testing results and recommendations will be provided immediately upon completion of the evaluation and a full diagnostic written report will be provided within 2-3 weeks.

Step 4: Therapy

Lawrence Speech Services, LLC provides individual speech and language therapy sessions, which are 45 minutes in length. Caregivers and parents/guardians will be consulted at the end of each therapy session and will be provided with activities to promote carry-over in the home setting. Consultation with doctors, teachers and therapists in the schools will be provided upon request, to ensure consistency in service delivery between providers. ...MORE

Evaluations (continued)

Our goal at Lawrence Speech Services, LLC is to make therapy fun, engaging, and functional. Therapy is guided by evidence-based practice (EBP), which is "the integration of: (a) clinical expertise/expert opinion, (b) external scientific evidence, and (c) client/patient/caregiver perspectives" (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association; www.asha.org).
We have experience working with adults and children who have speech and language difficulties related to:
  • -Aphasia
  • -Cognitive/Memory Disorder
  • -Dementia
  • -Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS)
  • -Autism Spectrum Disorders
  • -Down Syndrome
  • -Central Auditory Processing Disorder (CAPD)
  • -Fluency Disorders
  • -ADD/ADHD
  • -Developmental Delay
  • -Learning Disabilities

You can also inquire about our home-based therapy services, which are offered on a limited availability basis. Lawrence Speech Services, LLC provides home visits for several surrounding counties.

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CONTRACTING SERVICES

Lawrence Speech Services provides contract therapy services to schools in South Carolina. We have a wealth of experiences to offer. During the past seven years, myself and my Speech Language Pathologist Assistants, have had the pleasure of working with various agencies to ensure compliance within diverse areas of speech-language pathology—from providing school-based therapy aligned to the curriculum standards, federal Head Start programs in Berkeley as well as Colleton counties to home-based intervention. We have also contracted to provide services to various school districts that included speech-language therapy and diagnostic services including IEP preparation on Excent (Enrich trained).

During these experiences, it was rewarding to provide response to interventions, evaluations and therapeutic services to our most valuable assets in this state – the children! The children were able to participate in literacy-based language therapy sessions that improved their speech, language, and literacy skills. Parents, teachers and principals as well as directors have expressed delight with the high-quality of services that were provided. Exponential effort has been placed on emphasizing the value and quality of services that were provided to the children of South Carolina. It has been especially important to bridge the divide between school personnel and their perception of speech language professionals.

We look forward to the possibility of contracting/assisting with speech-language therapy services in the future should you need it . Contracting services can be on a part-time or full time bases. Rates are negotiable. Please feel free to contact us to discuss your school needs and negotiations. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Milestones

    • By Age One:

      - Recognizes name
      - Say 2-3 words besides “mama” and “dada”
      - Imitates familiar words
      - Understands simple instructions
      - Recognizes words as symbols for objects: Car-points to garage, cat-meows

      Activities to Encourage your Child’s Language:
      - Respond to your child’s coos, gurgles, and babbling
      - Talk to your child as you care for them throughout the day
      - Read colorful books to your child every day
      - Tell nursery rhymes and sing songs
      - Teach your child names of everyday items and familiar people
      - Take your child with you to new places and situations
      - Play simple games with your child such as “peek-a-boo” and “pat-a-cake”
    • Between Ages One and Two:

      - Understands “no”
      - Uses 10 to 20 words, including names
      - Combines two words such as “daddy bye-bye”
      - Waves good-bye and plays pat-a-cake
      - Makes the “sounds” of familiar animals
      - Gives a toy when asked
      - Uses words such as “more” to make wants known
      - Points to his or her toes, eyes, and nose
      - Brings object from another room when asked

      Activities to Encourage your Child’s Language:
      - Reward and encourage your child’s early efforts at saying new words
      - Talk to your child about everything you’re doing while you’re with him or her
      - Talk simply, clearly, and slowly to your child
      - Talk about new situations before you go, while you’re there, and again when you are home
      - Look at your child when he or she talks to you
      - Describe what your child is doing, feeling, hearing
      - Let your child listen to children’s records and tapes
      - Praise your child’s efforts to communicate
    • Between Ages Two and Three:

      - Identifies body parts
      - Carries on “conversation” with self and dolls
      - Asks “what’s that?” and “where’s my?”
      - Uses 2-word negative phrases such as “no want”
      - Forms some plurals by adding “s”: book? books
      - Has a 450 word vocabulary
      - Gives first name when asked
      - Holds up fingers to tell age
      - Combines nouns and verbs: “mommy go”
      - Understands simple time concepts: “last night”, “tomorrow”
      - Refers to self as “me “ rather than by name
      - Tries to get adult attention: “Watch me”
      - Likes to hear same story repeated
      - May say “no” when means “yes”
      - Talks to other children as well as adults
      - Solves problems by talking instead of hitting or crying
      - Answers “where” questions
      - Names common pictures and things
      - Uses short sentences like “me want more” or “me want juice”
      - Matches 3-4 colors
      - Knows “big” and “little”

      ...MORE
    • Between Ages Three and Four:

      - Can tell a story
      - Has a sentence length of 4-5 words
      - Has a vocabulary of nearly 1000 words
      - Names at least one color
      - Understands “yesterday”, “summer”, “lunchtime”, “tonight”
      - Begins to obey requests like “put the block under the chair”
      - Knows their last name, name of street on which he/she lives, and several nursery rhymes

      Activities to Encourage your Child’s Language:
      - Talk with your child about how objects are the same or different
      - Help your child to tell stories using books and pictures
      - Let your child play with other children
      - Read longer stories to your child
      - Pay attention to your child when they are talking
      - Talk to your child about places you’ve been or will be going
    • Between Ages Four and Five:

      - Has a sentence length of 4-5 words
      - Has a vocabulary of nearly 1500 words
      - Uses past tense correctly
      - Points to the colors red, blue, yellow, and green
      - Identifies triangles, circles, and squares
      - Understands “in the morning”, “next”, “noontime”
      - Can speak of imaginary conditions such as “I hope”
      - Asks many questions: “who?” and “why?”

      Activities to Encourage your Child’s Language:
      - Help your child sort objects and things (things you eat, things you wear, etc.)
      - Teach your child how to use the telephone
      - Let your child help plan activities such as what you will make for dinner
      - Continue talking with your child about their interests
      - Read longer stories to your child
      - Let your child make up stories for you
      - Show your pleasure when your child comes to talk to you
    • Between Ages Five and Six:

      - Has a sentence length of 5-6 words
      - Has a vocabulary of around 2000 words
      - Defines objects by their use (you eat with a fork) and can tell what objects are made of
      - Knows spatial relations like “on top”, “behind”, “far”, and “near”
      - Knows their address
      - Identifies penny, nickel, and dime
      - Knows common opposites like “big/little”
      - Understands “same” and “different”
      - Counts ten objects
      - Asks questions for information
      - Distinguishes between left and right hand
      - Uses all types of sentences: “Let’s go to the store after we eat”

      Activities to Encourage your Child’s Language:
      - Praise your child when they talk about their feelings, thoughts, hopes, and fears
      - Comment on what you did or how you think your child feels
      - Sing songs and recite rhymes with your child
      - Continue to read longer stories
      - Talk with your child as you would an adult
      - Look at family photos and talk to your child about your family history
      - Listen to your child when they talk to you

Milestones - Continued

    • By Age One:

      - Recognizes name
      - Say 2-3 words besides “mama” and “dada”
      - Imitates familiar words
      - Understands simple instructions
      - Recognizes words as symbols for objects: Car-points to garage, cat-meows

      Activities to Encourage your Child’s Language:
      - Respond to your child’s coos, gurgles, and babbling
      - Talk to your child as you care for them throughout the day
      - Read colorful books to your child every day
      - Tell nursery rhymes and sing songs
      - Teach your child names of everyday items and familiar people
      - Take your child with you to new places and situations
      - Play simple games with your child such as “peek-a-boo” and “pat-a-cake”
    • Between Ages One and Two:

      - Understands “no”
      - Uses 10 to 20 words, including names
      - Combines two words such as “daddy bye-bye”
      - Waves good-bye and plays pat-a-cake
      - Makes the “sounds” of familiar animals
      - Gives a toy when asked
      - Uses words such as “more” to make wants known
      - Points to his or her toes, eyes, and nose
      - Brings object from another room when asked

      Activities to Encourage your Child’s Language:
      - Reward and encourage your child’s early efforts at saying new words
      - Talk to your child about everything you’re doing while you’re with him or her
      - Talk simply, clearly, and slowly to your child
      - Talk about new situations before you go, while you’re there, and again when you are home
      - Look at your child when he or she talks to you
      - Describe what your child is doing, feeling, hearing
      - Let your child listen to children’s records and tapes
      - Praise your child’s efforts to communicate
    • Between Ages Two and Three: (continued)

      Activities to Encourage your Child’s Language:
      - Repeat new words over and over again
      - Help your child listen and follow instructions by playing games: “pick up the ball”; “touch Daddy’s nose”
      - Take your child on “trips” and talk about what you see before, during, and after the trip
      - Let your child tell you answers to simple questions
      - Read books every day, perhaps as part of a bedtime routine
      - Listen attentively as your child talks to you
      - Describe what you are doing, planning, thinking
      - Have your child deliver simple messages for you “Mommy needs you Daddy”
      - Carry on conversations with your child, preferably when the two of you have some quiet time together
      - Ask questions to get your child to think and talk
      - Show your child you understand what they say by answering, smiling, and nodding your head
      - Expand what your child says. If he or she says, “more juice”, you say “Andrew wants more juice”

      ...BACK
    • Between Ages Three and Four:

      - Can tell a story
      - Has a sentence length of 4-5 words
      - Has a vocabulary of nearly 1000 words
      - Names at least one color
      - Understands “yesterday”, “summer”, “lunchtime”, “tonight”
      - Begins to obey requests like “put the block under the chair”
      - Knows their last name, name of street on which he/she lives, and several nursery rhymes

      Activities to Encourage your Child’s Language:
      - Talk with your child about how objects are the same or different
      - Help your child to tell stories using books and pictures
      - Let your child play with other children
      - Read longer stories to your child
      - Pay attention to your child when they are talking
      - Talk to your child about places you’ve been or will be going
    • Between Ages Four and Five:

      - Has a sentence length of 4-5 words
      - Has a vocabulary of nearly 1500 words
      - Uses past tense correctly
      - Points to the colors red, blue, yellow, and green
      - Identifies triangles, circles, and squares
      - Understands “in the morning”, “next”, “noontime”
      - Can speak of imaginary conditions such as “I hope”
      - Asks many questions: “who?” and “why?”

      Activities to Encourage your Child’s Language:
      - Help your child sort objects and things (things you eat, things you wear, etc.)
      - Teach your child how to use the telephone
      - Let your child help plan activities such as what you will make for dinner
      - Continue talking with your child about their interests
      - Read longer stories to your child
      - Let your child make up stories for you
      - Show your pleasure when your child comes to talk to you
    • Between Ages Five and Six:

      - Has a sentence length of 5-6 words
      - Has a vocabulary of around 2000 words
      - Defines objects by their use (you eat with a fork) and can tell what objects are made of
      - Knows spatial relations like “on top”, “behind”, “far”, and “near”
      - Knows their address
      - Identifies penny, nickel, and dime
      - Knows common opposites like “big/little”
      - Understands “same” and “different”
      - Counts ten objects
      - Asks questions for information
      - Distinguishes between left and right hand
      - Uses all types of sentences: “Let’s go to the store after we eat”

      Activities to Encourage your Child’s Language:
      - Praise your child when they talk about their feelings, thoughts, hopes, and fears
      - Comment on what you did or how you think your child feels
      - Sing songs and recite rhymes with your child
      - Continue to read longer stories
      - Talk with your child as you would an adult
      - Look at family photos and talk to your child about your family history
      - Listen to your child when they talk to you

Contact Information

Lawrence Speech Services
1408 Russell Street, Suite 13
Orangeburg, SC 29115
Telephone: (803) 378-1796
FAX: (803) 937-1938
Thanks you for contacting Lawrence Speech Services. We will respond to your request as soon as possible.